BLACKBERRY MOUNTAIN
ASSOCIATION

Blackberry Mountain is a private, gated, deed restricted community. Properties for sale may be viewed when accompanied by real estate agents and property owners only.

MANAGER
Becki Taylor

Phone 706 273.3100
Fax 706 273.3201

After Hours Emergencies
Water and Gate Systems
(leave name, phone number and brief message)
706 889-8179


MAILING ADDRESS
Blackberry Mountain Association
25 Blackberry Mountain Drive #8101
Ellijay, GA 30536

ASSOCIATION DOCUMENTS
BMA Handbook
Bylaws & CCRs
Maps

BOARD OF DIRECTORS
David Galusha, President
Dave Teffeteller, Vice President
Carolyn Sewell, Treasurer
Rich Baker, Secretary
Dolly Vantrepotte,
Member at Large


DESIGN COMMITTEE
Barbara Dunson
Jennifer Fontenot
Dave Teffeteller


To protect the privacy of Blackberry Mountain Association members, the membership directory is not available to the public. Contact the association office to obtain a copy of the directory.

 

 

 

 

 

BMA Map

Closing for the purchase of the 13 parcels/18 acre tract bounded by Blackberry Mountain Drive, Indian Cave Road and Pheasant Run Lane occurred on April 6, 2017. This purchase by Blackberry Mountain Association fulfills a commitment made to its members in 1995. This action prevents the development of the tract into 13 small acreage home lots and the resulting negative impact on the Association's infrastructure, roads, water supplies and residents’ property values. This was Blackberry's last developer-owned tract, and its purchase means that Association members now have control of the entirety of Blackberry Mountain. At the same time, it preserves the tract as a natural, wooded green space, wildlife habitat and a valuable asset to Blackberry residents. 
The 18 acre tract was purchased for $130,000. $49,000 from the Association's reserve account was used as a down payment, and the balance has been financed. The down payment and monthly payments will NOT necessitate the need for either a special assessment or an increase in quarterly assessments. 
The 18 acres will remain as open green space and part of the Association's common areas. 
This is a tremendous achievement. For the first time since the development's origin in 1981, Association members now have ownership of all of Blackberry Mountain. 


Community Watch
 
Building on the colonial America concept of town watch, Community Watch is simply an organized group of neighbors committed to vandalism and crime detection and prevention - NOT intervention.
Communication is a key element of this program, and technology can be a useful communication tool. If interested, check out and join the Blackberry Mountain Next Door Community.
Community Watch


Annual Meeting 2016 Newsletter

Download the Annual Meeting December 2016 Blackberry Juice.

Click on the image to download the Adobe Acrobat Reader pdf file.

2016 Annual Meeting


BEAR ALERT!
Bears are present in Blackberry. Please do not leave any food out (bird feeders, deer, pet food or garbage). Bears have a very keen sense of smell, it is dangerous for the bear and for residents by luring bears away from their natural food sources and dissolving the bear’s natural fear of humans. Removing the food source to bears is a critical step in resolving bear/human conflict. It may take a few days for the bear to learn that it is no longer going to be provided with a free and easy meal; once he does he will move on to another area. There have been no recorded bear attacks on humans in Georgia, but it is important to remember that while it may be exciting to see a bear – they are wild animals. You should never approach a bear. Keep your pets under close watch as we have also had coyotes in the area and they are known to attack small animals.

Hemlock Blight
Unrelated to the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid infestation, but due to the wet, humid summer, some of Blackberry’s hemlocks, particularly those in dense clusters along the river, have become infected with a needle and twig blight, rosellinia fungus.
During the fall and winter, the fungal spores are dormant, but dead and dropping needles indicate their presence. It is unknown what effect the coming winter weather will have on the blight.
In past years, an application of a combination of fungicides has produced moderate control. Since all of the spores must be covered with the chemical application to disrupt the fungal life cycle, the treatment can be expensive, and unfortunately, is not guaranteed to be 100% effective at this time.
The ideal time to treat for this needle blight is early summer. For now, if the hemlocks on your property are showing signs of the fungus (dead and dropped needles), it is recommended that you remove and dispose of the infected branches.


Hemlock Woolly Adelgid
Treatment Program

Blackberry's Hemlocks are under attack by the invasive Woolly Adelgid. All of the hemlocks were treated in the early summer of 2012. However, you may continue to see the insects' white, cottony egg sacs for some time.
The larger trees will be re-reated in 2013 as well.
The treatment program has been funded through association dues and will be paid over a 3 year period.
The hemlocks have been treated with soil-injected imidacloprid.
Imidacloprid can take from 6 weeks to 12 months or longer to become effective depending on the size of the tree, and it might take several years to achieve complete control and show new growth, particularly in large diameter trees.
Improvement on infested hemlocks means a lessening of the infestation, very little reinfestation (new bright white egg sacs) the following spring, improved foliage color and density, and new growth on the branch tips.
Small trees take up the solution and disperse it throughout the entire tree in a matter of months, and normally show improvement between 6 and 12 months. This process takes longer for larger trees, sometimes as long as 12 -18 months. Since the lower limbs are the last part to receive the benefit of treatment, they are usually the last ones to show improvement.

 
 

COPYRIGHT © 2006 DAVE TEFFETELLER • ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

NOTICES


Design Committee Forms

Tree and Plant Removal
New Construction and Remodeling

Exterior Finishes Palette


Native Plant Guide


BOARD MEETING
May 19, 2017
2:30 pm


Board meetings are normally held the third Friday of each month but are subject to change.

Contact the office to obtain information about attending a meeting or having an item placed on the agenda.


Renter Information
Form


Septic System Info
Environmental Safety Department
Gilmer Co Courthouse
706 635-6050
M-F 8-9 am & 1-2 pm


What You Can Do Now To Protect Your Hemlocks

• Keep your hemlocks     healthy
• Don’t encourage birds to feed or roost in your hemlocks
• Don’t feed deer and    other wildlife on your property
• Don’t transplant         hemlocks
• Don’t plant nursery-grown hemlocks into your landscape

Notify your facilitator if you find HWA on your hemlocks